Thanks to everyone who came to the iYouth Welcome meeting last Wednesday!

The professional panel had some wonderful tips for the incoming year of MLIS students. For those who missed the meeting, here is a roundup of what was discussed. The next iYouth simulcast meeting on Adobe Connect will be recorded so that anyone can watch it at a later date.

Our panel:

From left to right: Claire Scott, Erin Sterling, Eliza Dresang

Claire Scott works at the Northgate Branch of the Seattle Public Library as a public children’s librarian. She would like to join iYouth later in the year for a Children’s Literature Pub Quiz. Claire.Scott@spl.org

Erin Sterling works as a school librarian at Eckstein Middle School. She is a recent alumna of the University of Washington MLIS program. emsterling@seattleschools.org

Eliza Dresang is the Beverly Cleary Professor in Youth Services at the University of Washington iSchool; she teaches many library related children and teen classes. edresang@uw.edu

Tips and Resources

  • Katie Davis, a UW iSchool professor, is teaching a new course this spring on child/teen brain development in regards to information.
  • Journals like Voice of Youth Advocates – VOYA (http://www.voyamagazine.com/) and School Library Journal (http://www.slj.com/) are great publications to keep up to date with new books and information in the field. You can gain free access to these journals online through the University of Washington or VOYA’s digital version.
  • Join professional organizations and the associated divisions at reduced student rates to network. Get the bonus of going to conferences at student rates. For ALA (American Library Association) join groups such as YALSA (Young Adult Library Services Association), AASL (American Association of School Librarians), and ALSC (Association for Library Services to Children). For WLA (the Washington Library Association join the CAYAS (Children and Young Adult Services) interest group.
  • As a student get a two for one student rate to your state organization, such as WLA (Washington Library Association) and ALA (American Library Association) http://www.ala.org/groups/joint-membership-program. If you call the membership number you may still be able to get the single rate deal as a student all year (even though it says the deal has expired online).
  • To join WLMA (Washington Library Media Association) as a UW iSchool student for free, email Lorraine Bruce (lbruce@uw.edu). She will probably forward you to Pat McKinley (pamckinley@directv.net) for registration.

If you have any questions about anything discussed, please email iyouth.info@gmail.com and we will get back to you as soon as possible. 

Links, Tips, Committees, and Bunnies from the CYS Advising Pod

Last week’s advising pod on children’s and youth services was an informative, well-attended event, full of relevant information and inside tips on how to navigate the world of CYS.

High points include:

  • Become a member of ALA (American Library Association), then also join (as relevant to you and your professional needs) ALSC (Association for Library Service to Children), YALSA (Young Adult Library Services Association), AASL (American Association of School Librarians).
  • Find a way to attend ALA Midwinter and research some of the committees ALA offers–you can sit in on many of the meetings and decide if you want to join. Joining committees is a great way to network, build a name for yourself in the profession, and work your way towards those coveted Newbery, Caldecott, and Printz award committees! But there are committees on all sorts of aspects of librarianship, including early literacy and multiculturalism.
  • Use the iSchool website to learn about faculty and their research and contact them. Especially if you’re an online student, this is a good way to make connections and build relationships, even remotely. If you are local, come to the iSchool Research Fair on Thursday November 15 at 6:30 at the Burke Museum. Find more information here.
  • Recommended courses relating to CYS that may not be part of the Media Endorsement track:
    • LIS 568: Information Literacy for Teaching and Learning
    • LIS 588: Special Librarianship
    • LIS 567: Public Library Services for Youth

So we’ve covered links, tips, committees, and…

oh, right! Bunnies!

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Tips and Tricks of the Trade

Happy Halloween! Ready for some not-so-spooky tips and tricks?

The MLIS program at the iSchool is very theory-based, which has its upsides and downsides. You learn about the higher levels of thinking in the field, and you analyze how broad swathes of users gather, organize, and access information. On the other hand, you’re sometimes left scratching your head, wondering how these theories apply to the real-world tasks of a librarian.

Applications are there, however, best illustrated by some kind of on-the-job experience. Whether you decide to a do a directed field-work, volunteer at a library, or conduct some informational interviews with knowledgeable librarians, you’re learning how theory meets practice. We’ll continue to have more information about these opportunities.

In the meantime, take a look at this blog post about ten things you may not learn in library school but are super important on the job. How could you go about acquiring these tools? What do you think you want and/or need to learn before you become a librarian?